"Cold muscles and tendons are at much greater risk for overuse injuries."
—on the occupational disease they call "computer syndrome", from a 2007 Journal (source)
According to doctors and ergonomics professionals, cold temperatures are a possible cause of Musculoskeletal Disorders, including repetitive strain injury.
Keeping your hands warm is a rule of thumb for prevention and gloves or hand warmers are recommended for this reason.
(For more information about MSDs and additional methods for prevention, see source here.)

A 2015 study found a notable decrease of hand skin surface temperature during prolonged work with a computer mouse.  (14.8% average decrease with a regular computer mouse over a 3 hour period of work).  Moreover, the temperature of fingers became extremely low, close to the ambient temperature (23.6˚C or 74.5˚F) and even slightly lower, after prolonged work at a computer. 
Prolonged low temperature and probably impaired blood supply to peripheral tissues in hands may be important contributing factors for the development of tissue damage, e.g., small nerve fibers.  A normal body temperature is needed for optimal action of the biochemical reactions in a cell.[1][2]
(To read more about this study, view the publication online here.)
[1]Daniel R.M., Danson M.J. A new understanding of how temperature affects the catalytic activity of enzymes. Trend. Biochem. Sci. 2010;35:584–591. doi: 10.1016/j.tibs.2010.05.001. [Google Scholar]
[2]Daniel R.M., Peterson M.E., Danson M.J., Price N.C., Kelly S.M., Monk C.R., Weinberg C.S., Oudshoorn M.L., Lee C.K. The molecular basis of the effect of temperature on enzyme activity. Biochem. J. 2009;425:353–360. doi: 10.1042/BJ20091254. [Google Scholar]

52.7% of developers spend 9 - 12 hours per day on the computer
13.2% spend over 12 hours per day on the computer
—according to a Stack Overflow survey in 2018 (source)
With more and more computer-related employment in today's society, it is more important than ever to make ergonomic efforts for our health!
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