Reviews from Etsy:
Oct 27, 2020 (5 stars) Just got them in & they are STUNNING!! You might say "its just basic black...how can they be stunning?" If you know anything about craftsmanship then you can appreciate the term "stunning". They warmers are no joke when it comes to the detail & time that's been put into them. I randomly found out about this vender from Raynaud's website & I'm thankful I did. The style & design are perfect for having full range of motion while keeping warm. Make sure you measure your hand for correct sizing but suffice to say these are worth it!!!
Feb 4, 2020 (5 stars) Super comfortable! They felt a little too big at first but now I recognize their total freedom of movement. They're cozy, a little fluffy even, and they immediately helped alleviat my wrist pain. I work in front of a computer all day and my wrists get cold over time and start to ache. Now that just isn't a concern anymore. Love them!
Sept 24, 2020 (5 stars) These are so soft and look very warm. Great quality.
Dec 3, 2019 (4 stars) Quick shipping, easy packaging, and the product has relieved a bit of pain in my hands.
Oct 6, 2020 (5 stars) Super soft and well made
July 7, 2020 (5 stars) It's very cozy and keeps my wrists warm and snug
More Testimonials:
"These gloves are super comfy and have completely changed my experience with the numerous devices I have to use while working from home.  They offer extra padding when resting my palms and they're slightly warm but not hot. I can see the benefits these gloves can have for people who are uncomfortable while using their hands to work over a number of hours."
- Pricelda Cid, OTR/Ergonomist

"I've been using these gloves for the last couple of months. They are extremely comfortable to use. I sit in front of a computer in an air conditioned office and these do a great job in keeping my hands warm while keeping the freedom to type. Fabric is soft and nice to the touch."
-Jen
"I love these gloves; they are so cute and comfy! These gloves are perfect for working in my office! My office is kept freezing cold and I am always looking for fingerless gloves that I can wear to keep warm while being able maintain functionality when typing and using my mouse at my desk. I've tried so many different types of gloves and none have done the trick until these. My hands stay warm and cozy while I can type as quickly as normal due to the lack of material on my fingers and thumbs when wearing these gloves. They're so comfortable that I have forgotten I'm wearing them when I leave the office. I would highly suggest these for anyone wanting to keep their hands warm while being able to carry out normal day-to-day tasks. I'll continue to use them at work every day!"

-Michelle
"These hand warmers are great for keeping my hands warm while gaming. Though getting my grip right on my controller was a bit hard at first, it gets easier after some practice.
I find it mostly helps during intense games where the blood leaves my fingers. If the room is really cold I still need to supplement with bag hand warmers to keep them from getting too cold.
Overall, would recommend 5/5! They aren’t magical but if you have hand issues these help a ton!"
-Gilbert
"Like a little blanket for your hand, these hand warmers are super comfortable, so much so that I often forget I’m wearing them! Wearing them throughout the day keeps my hands toasty and warm without making my hands sweat. Following Julia’s directions, it was easy to figure out what size hand warmer I needed, and when they arrived they fit perfectly. Wearing them often throughout the day, I found that the warmers did need to be washed sooner than I expected, and were not super stain-resistant. Overall I highly recommend!"
-Hannah
"We know many people with Raynaud’s are skeptical about fingerless gloves, as the fingertips are left open to cold temperatures.   But think about how a scarf around the back of your neck helps warm your whole body.  Covering the arteries in the wrist helps keep the whole hand warmer.  True, they aren’t a substitute outdoors for wooly mittens or heated gloves, but indoors when you’re chilled and need dexterity to type, play a musical instrument or just navigate the kitchen, they can offer welcome relief."
- from a review from the Raynaud's Association, read the full review here.
More Stats and Information:
"Cold muscles and tendons are at much greater risk for overuse injuries."
—on the occupational disease they call "computer syndrome", from a 2007 Journal (source)

A 2015 study found a notable decrease of hand skin surface temperature during prolonged work with a computer mouse.  (14.8% average decrease with a regular computer mouse over a 3 hour period of work).  Moreover, the temperature of fingers became extremely low, close to the ambient temperature (23.6˚C or 74.5˚F) and even slightly lower, after prolonged work at a computer. 
Prolonged low temperature and probably impaired blood supply to peripheral tissues in hands may be important contributing factors for the development of tissue damage, e.g., small nerve fibers.  A normal body temperature is needed for optimal action of the biochemical reactions in a cell.[1][2]
(To read more about this study, view the publication online here.)
[1]Daniel R.M., Danson M.J. A new understanding of how temperature affects the catalytic activity of enzymes. Trend. Biochem. Sci. 2010;35:584–591. doi: 10.1016/j.tibs.2010.05.001. [Google Scholar]
[2]Daniel R.M., Peterson M.E., Danson M.J., Price N.C., Kelly S.M., Monk C.R., Weinberg C.S., Oudshoorn M.L., Lee C.K. The molecular basis of the effect of temperature on enzyme activity. Biochem. J. 2009;425:353–360. doi: 10.1042/BJ20091254. [Google Scholar]

From the book, Repetitive Strain Injury: A Computer User's Guide:
Cold hands can be a warning sign of RSI. (p 21)
In regards to gloves at the office: "Fingerless wool gloves may be helpful [for RSI] if your hands get cold; just make sure they don't choke your fingers. 'Support' style gloves work rather like splints, so don't work while wearing them." (p 129) (Refiber gloves keep movement unrestrained and the fingers free!)
Among other tips about retraining typing techniques, the hand warm-up for RSI includes this step: "Hold your hand to your cheek.  Does it feel cold? If so, put on fingerless gloves." (p 184)
Emil Pascarelli, M.D., Deborah Quilter, Repetitive Strain Injury: A Computer User's Guide, Wiley, 1994 (access the book for free here)


52.7% of developers spend 9 - 12 hours per day on the computer, 13.2% spend over 12 hours per day on the computer
—according to a Stack Overflow survey in 2018 (source)

With more and more computer-related employment in today's society, it is more important than ever to make ergonomic efforts for our health!
Disclaimer: Content on refiberdesigns.com is not intended for the purpose of medical advice.  All information, content, and material of this website is for informational purposes only and are not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or physical/occupational therapist.
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